Can Someone With Poor Math Skills Do Well In Statistics Self-Improvement in Numbers

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Self-Improvement in Numbers

I am an expert in self-improvement. Not the current one act of self-improvement, I just happen to be able to summarize about every other book in the self-help section of your local store. It’s not something I’m proud of, but life is a bumpy road and we find ourselves in seemingly helpless situations where we’re willing to look under every rock for a clue. Don’t get me wrong; I have certainly improved in motivation for more productive and useful actions. Pop psychology, NLP, hypnosis, meditation, various other self-help books – I’ve tried everything, and everyone has their own success story. However, I have noticed that there is one key to any self-improvement that is very often overlooked – the importance of quantify your progress!

The single most important thing in self-improvement, next to writing and documenting your progress and lessons learned, is knowing how to do it. objectively measure change. If you measure your success based solely on how good or bad you feel about a situation, then you are wrong and any progress you make will be short-lived at best. In the realm of true self-improvement, there will be times when you make great leaps in progress but feel like crap, and other times where you feel great but make no progress at all.

It is important to follow your heart, but more important is the need to rely on the skills of your mind and rational thinking. Emotions and feelings are an inevitable part of life (and there are times where it should be embraced) but recognize them for what they often are in the realm of self-improvement – mud in your mind, clouds in your judgment. Be an empiricist, and be aware that a scientist is only as good as his point of observation.

How do you quantify your progress? Well, to put it simply, assign numbers to the attributes and skills you want to improve. But it gets a little more complicated then. How do you think a bodybuilder knows he’s better? Do you judge your progress by how you feel when you wake up in the morning? Of course not. Some days he wakes up and feels energized, other times he wakes up and feels sick, but the bodybuilder knows that he is just as good as he did that day in the gym – there is no other reasonable way to measure his success. He he knows he is improving because he can lift X more weight than he could have the month before.

This example is very intuitive for most, but then people do not follow how to apply the lesson all types of self-improvement, whether it’s being social, studying habits, eating healthy, learning the guitar, how to throw a baseball, or any other skill. Everything can be translated into numbers – and as the old saying goes: numbers don’t lie.

With this understood, you can not just choose any type of measurement, you need to think about it first! First ask yourself what exactly you want to improve. This could be something as simple and straightforward as “how fast can I throw a baseball” or it could be something more complicated and multi-dimensional like “becoming a better pitcher” (which includes a variety of “subskills”, not just how. fast you can launch).

If you find yourself saying that you want to be better at something, a quality, then it takes a little creativity to have the most effective way to quantify your measurements. You may need to play around with your measurement equation before you find something that maximizes your output (so to speak). For example, becoming a better pitcher, there are a variety of things you may want to pay attention to: win/loss ratio, earned run average (ERA), innings pitched, etc. These are in-game stats, but they’re still there. things you can work on outside of the game: practice hours per week. During practice, you can break down your focus into more specific attributes: throw faster, throw more strikes (better accuracy), fewer curveballs stuck, fewer wilds.

First, take the skill or behavior you want to improve, then dissect it into its most basic parts. Pay attention to any key terms that indicate a potential measurement: more / less, faster / slower (speed), heavier / lighter (mass), bigger / smaller (size), closer / closer (distance) , before / after (time), etc. Your choice for measurement is important: make sure it is something that is the closest and causally related to getting where you want with whatever behavior or skill you are trying to train.

Once you understand the basics, write them down somewhere. Find out which subskills you want to work on, the best way to measure them, how often to measure them. Then set goals. Where do you want to be in a week, month, year? Build a rough outline: I once created a self-improvement program in Microsoft Excel that I stuck to for two full years – with great success! On top of all your measurements, keep a journal and a journal entry where you can leave the emotional side of your improvement. Here you can discuss how you feel, what mental blocks may be holding you back, and your ideas for overcoming them.

Before I end this segment, let me mention one more great thing about numbers: they are very suggestive. Even if you never liked math, our mind loves numbers. Numbers really help us do our best feel more real. When we see that we can run an extra mile this week than we could the previous one – it’s much more satisfying. This knowledge can motivate us to go further, literally… to go that extra mile, that extra hour, that one less piece of cake, or one less cigarette. Numbers are a language directed to the subconscious mind, they have a very simple implication (to improve or not to improve?). So the next time you fill out your latest self-improvement log in your journal, try pulling out the meter and writing down some numbers. Stay consistent, put out your best scientist, and see the payoff.

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